Love'sWords

Love'sWords When was the last time you took an interest in somethng/someone outside of yourself?

ukpuru:

Igbo Mgbedike mask, William Buller Fagg, 1946.

Reblogged from ukpuru

ukpuru:

Igbo Mgbedike mask, William Buller Fagg, 1946.

ukpuru:


REAR VIEW OF NKANDA. BABONG.

— Elliott Leib and Renee Romano, 1984.

Reblogged from ukpuru

ukpuru:

REAR VIEW OF NKANDA. BABONG.

— Elliott Leib and Renee Romano, 1984.

blackgirlwhiteboylove:

misskittyfantastico:

girlswillsavethevorld:

punkrockcow:

ultrafacts:

Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

WHY WASNT THIS NATIONAL NEWS?!

I think we know why.

This made Atlanta news because it happened not far from where I live. It was only a few months after Sandy Hook and I just remember crying from relief when I heard about this woman and how she managed to prevent another tragedy through compassion and empathy.

She’s amazing.

Reblogged from blackgirlwhiteboylove

blackgirlwhiteboylove:

misskittyfantastico:

girlswillsavethevorld:

punkrockcow:

ultrafacts:

Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

WHY WASNT THIS NATIONAL NEWS?!

I think we know why.

This made Atlanta news because it happened not far from where I live. It was only a few months after Sandy Hook and I just remember crying from relief when I heard about this woman and how she managed to prevent another tragedy through compassion and empathy.

She’s amazing.

thepeoplesrecord:

Michelle Alexander: White men get rich from legal pot, black men stay in prisonMarch 14, 2014
Ever since Colorado and Washington made the unprecedented move to legalize recreational pot last year, excitement and stories of unfettered success have billowed into the air. Colorado’s marijuana tax revenue far exceeded expectations, bringing a whopping $185 million to the state and tourists are lining up to taste the budding culture (pun intended). Several other states are now looking to follow suit and legalize. 
But the ramifications of this momentous shift are left unaddressed. When you flick on the TV to a segment about the flowering pot market in Colorado, you’ll find that the faces of the movement are primarily white and male. Meanwhile, many of the more than  210,000 people who were arrested for marijuana possession in Colorado between 1986 and 2010 according to a report from the Marijuana Arrest Research Project, remain behind bars. Thousands of black men and boys still sit in prisons for possession of the very plant that’s making those white guys on TV rich.
“In many ways the imagery doesn’t sit right,” said Michelle Alexander, associate professor of law at Ohio State University and author of  The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness in a  public conversation on March 6 with Asha Bandele of the  Drug Policy Alliance.  “Here are white men poised to run big marijuana businesses, dreaming of cashing in big—big money, big businesses selling weed—after 40 years of impoverished black kids getting prison time for selling weed, and their families and futures destroyed. Now, white men are planning to get rich doing precisely the same thing?”
Alexander said she is “thrilled” that Colorado and Washington have legalized pot and that Washington D.C. decriminalized possession of small amounts earlier this month. But she said she’s noticed “warning signs” of a troubling trend emerging in the pot legalization movement: Whites—men in particular—are the face of the movement, and the emerging pot industry. (A recent In These Times article titled “ The Unbearable Whiteness of Marijuana Legalization,” summarize this trend.)
Alexander said for 40 years poor communities of color have experienced the wrath of the war on drugs.
“Black men and boys” have been the target of the war on drugs’ racist policies—stopped, frisked and disturbed—“often before they’re old enough to vote,” she said. Those youths are arrested most often for nonviolent first offenses that would go ignored in middle-class white neighborhoods.
“We arrest these kids at young ages, saddle them with criminal records, throw them in cages, and then release them into a parallel social universe in which the very civil and human rights supposedly won in the Civil Rights movement no longer apply to them for the rest of their lives,” she said. “They can be discriminated against [when it comes to] employment, housing, access to education, public benefits. They’re locked into a permanent second-class status for life. And we’ve done this in precisely the communities that were most in need of our support.”
As Asha Bandele of DPA pointed out during the conversation, the U.S. has 5% of the world’s population and 25% of the world’s prisoners. Today, 2.2 million people are in prison or jail and 7.7 million are under the control of the criminal justice system, with African American boys and men—and now women—making up a disproportionate number of those imprisoned.
Alexander’s book was published four years ago and spent 75 weeks on the New York Timesbestseller list, helping to bring mass incarceration to the forefront of the national discussion.
Alexander said over the last four years, as she’s been traveling from state to state speaking to audiences from prisons to universities about her book, she’s witnessed an “awakening.” More and more people are talking about mass incarceration, racism and the war on drugs.
Full article


I forget the specifics but in Cincinnati, a political figure is moving/ proposing that some marijuana offenses be pardoned regardless of how the public feels about weed. Heard it on the news in passing, should have payed more attention.

Reblogged from 2brwngrls

thepeoplesrecord:

Michelle Alexander: White men get rich from legal pot, black men stay in prison
March 14, 2014

Ever since Colorado and Washington made the unprecedented move to legalize recreational pot last year, excitement and stories of unfettered success have billowed into the air. Colorado’s marijuana tax revenue far exceeded expectations, bringing a whopping $185 million to the state and tourists are lining up to taste the budding culture (pun intended). Several other states are now looking to follow suit and legalize. 

But the ramifications of this momentous shift are left unaddressed. When you flick on the TV to a segment about the flowering pot market in Colorado, you’ll find that the faces of the movement are primarily white and male. Meanwhile, many of the more than  210,000 people who were arrested for marijuana possession in Colorado between 1986 and 2010 according to a report from the Marijuana Arrest Research Project, remain behind bars. Thousands of black men and boys still sit in prisons for possession of the very plant that’s making those white guys on TV rich.

“In many ways the imagery doesn’t sit right,” said Michelle Alexander, associate professor of law at Ohio State University and author of  The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness in a  public conversation on March 6 with Asha Bandele of the  Drug Policy Alliance.  “Here are white men poised to run big marijuana businesses, dreaming of cashing in big—big money, big businesses selling weed—after 40 years of impoverished black kids getting prison time for selling weed, and their families and futures destroyed. Now, white men are planning to get rich doing precisely the same thing?”

Alexander said she is “thrilled” that Colorado and Washington have legalized pot and that Washington D.C. decriminalized possession of small amounts earlier this month. But she said she’s noticed “warning signs” of a troubling trend emerging in the pot legalization movement: Whites—men in particular—are the face of the movement, and the emerging pot industry. (A recent In These Times article titled “ The Unbearable Whiteness of Marijuana Legalization,” summarize this trend.)

Alexander said for 40 years poor communities of color have experienced the wrath of the war on drugs.

“Black men and boys” have been the target of the war on drugs’ racist policies—stopped, frisked and disturbed—“often before they’re old enough to vote,” she said. Those youths are arrested most often for nonviolent first offenses that would go ignored in middle-class white neighborhoods.

“We arrest these kids at young ages, saddle them with criminal records, throw them in cages, and then release them into a parallel social universe in which the very civil and human rights supposedly won in the Civil Rights movement no longer apply to them for the rest of their lives,” she said. “They can be discriminated against [when it comes to] employment, housing, access to education, public benefits. They’re locked into a permanent second-class status for life. And we’ve done this in precisely the communities that were most in need of our support.”

As Asha Bandele of DPA pointed out during the conversation, the U.S. has 5% of the world’s population and 25% of the world’s prisoners. Today, 2.2 million people are in prison or jail and 7.7 million are under the control of the criminal justice system, with African American boys and men—and now women—making up a disproportionate number of those imprisoned.

Alexander’s book was published four years ago and spent 75 weeks on the New York Timesbestseller list, helping to bring mass incarceration to the forefront of the national discussion.

Alexander said over the last four years, as she’s been traveling from state to state speaking to audiences from prisons to universities about her book, she’s witnessed an “awakening.” More and more people are talking about mass incarceration, racism and the war on drugs.

Full article

I forget the specifics but in Cincinnati, a political figure is moving/ proposing that some marijuana offenses be pardoned regardless of how the public feels about weed. Heard it on the news in passing, should have payed more attention.

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

sasha-thumper:

darvinasafo:

Not at all.

All of Daniel Holtzclaw’s victims were Black women btw.Don’t leave that out. 

Reblogged from aroyalmind

sasha-thumper:

darvinasafo:

Not at all.

All of Daniel Holtzclaw’s victims were Black women btw.Don’t leave that out. 

Reblogged from thequietawakening

isseymiyucky:

Women of Djibouti, Africa

Reblogged from metztlixochitl

femtoxic:

-imaginarythoughts-:

land-of-propaganda:

Shaun King exposes Ferguson PD lie about distance from SUV

Click here to watch the video

This needs to be brought to attention IMMEDIATELY!!!!!

I don’t even understand what they’re expecting anymore. if they can lie to us to our face and us KNOW the truth, what power do we have , then?

babylonfalling:

my sweet lord / today is a killer

Reblogged from abstrackafricana

babylonfalling:

my sweet lord / today is a killer

dynamicafrica:

Photograph of a tattooed Yoruba woman.
If you’d like to know more about body marks, scarification and tattooing in Yoruba culture, this video of Chief Atanda explaining the history and meaning behind it will shed a lot of light on this practice.
Further reading.
AUGUST: Celebrating African Women

Reblogged from darkgirlswirl

dynamicafrica:

Photograph of a tattooed Yoruba woman.

If you’d like to know more about body marks, scarification and tattooing in Yoruba culture, this video of Chief Atanda explaining the history and meaning behind it will shed a lot of light on this practice.

Further reading.

AUGUST: Celebrating African Women

tamarajuana:

Mona Lisa Bonet, 2014 Sage White
For @topazjones single “Mona Lisa Bonet”

Reblogged from missj0hnson

tamarajuana:

Mona Lisa Bonet, 2014
Sage White

For @topazjones single “Mona Lisa Bonet”

Reblogged from freeyourdome

darvinasafo:

Black Excellence

Reblogged from thechronicleofshe

leseanthomas:

NYC in the 1980s.

Love.

Memories.


After picking up a camera at the age of 15, Jamel Shabazz has been unknowingly become the first “visual documentarian” of hip hop. For over 30 years he’s captured the world around him. Every frame  of that world is a time portal that sparks emotion stemming from the scenes they represent. And if there is ever a glimpse into the foundations of street wear and its surrounding culture, it can be found in the pages of his first book.

“Back In The Days” is real deal documentation as it pertains to the origins of hip hop, not to mention hip hop fashion. No 2oK a day models. No makeup artists. No food trucks. The models in the book don’t need runways because they lived the life of style. Jamel Shabazz was there to capture it all.”

Purchase here: http://www.jamelshabazz.com/monographs.html

lostinurbanism:

Haiti (1985)
Photograph by Paul Souders

Watch “Black in Latin America”

Reblogged from lostinurbanism

lostinurbanism:

Haiti (1985)

Photograph by Paul Souders

Watch “Black in Latin America”

18-15n-77-30w:

massconflict:

A woman kneels on the street amid tear gas during a demonstration over the fatal shooting of black teenager Michael Brown by a police officer in Missouri.
Aug. 18, 2014


Remember HER!

Reblogged from 18-15n-77-30w

18-15n-77-30w:

massconflict:

A woman kneels on the street amid tear gas during a demonstration over the fatal shooting of black teenager Michael Brown by a police officer in Missouri.

Aug. 18, 2014

Remember HER!

supercali-live:

Me as a Toni Morrison novel

Reblogged from 18-15n-77-30w

supercali-live:

Me as a Toni Morrison novel